Club Fang
Marry, sir, they have commited false report; moreover, they have spoken untruths; secondarily, they are a superstitious and cowardly lot; sixth and lastly, I am vengeance; thirdly, I am the night; and, to conclude, I am Batman.
(via renkris)

epicreads:

18 YA Shakespeare retellings ––>

ROMEO AND JULIET

Saving Juliet by Suzanne Selfors
Still Star-Crossed by Melinda Taub
Arcadia Awakens by Kai Meyer
Juliet Immortal by Stacey Jay
Street Love by Walter Dean Myers
When You Were Mine by Rebecca Serle
The Juliet Club by Suzanne Harper

HAMLET

Falling for Hamlet by Michelle Ray
Ophelia by Lisa M. Klein
Something Rotten by Alan Gratz

MACBETH

Enter Three Witches by Caroline B. Cooney
Exposure by Kim Askew and Amy Helmes
Lady Macbeth’s Daughter by Lisa M. Klein

12th NIGHT

The Fool’s Girl by Celia Rees
Illyria by Elizabeth Hand

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

Eyes Like Stars by Lisa Mantchev
A Midsummer Tights Dream by Louise Rennison
Wondrous Strange by Lesley Livingston

Happy Birthday, Shakespeare!

O Verona & Escape - Craig Armstrong (Romeo + Juliet soundtrack)

Off to see NT Live’s Coriolanus today, so leaving you with some Shakespeare-infused tunes to get inspired.


I do love Othello, because it’s a forensic examination of jealousy and power, and the delicacy of being in love with somebody. If you’re uncertain in your affection and in their affection for you, you can so easily be turned and possessed by the green-eyed monster of jealousy, which eats you up and ultimately destroys the love that was there in the first place. Also, it’s got some of the most heart-attack poetry that’s ever been written in the English language.

I do love Othello, because it’s a forensic examination of jealousy and power, and the delicacy of being in love with somebody. If you’re uncertain in your affection and in their affection for you, you can so easily be turned and possessed by the green-eyed monster of jealousy, which eats you up and ultimately destroys the love that was there in the first place. Also, it’s got some of the most heart-attack poetry that’s ever been written in the English language.

Much Ado Trailer!

Could do without the flashy bulbs and text toward the end, but Whedon Shakespeare I want you NOW!

swim-two-birds:

If you’ve never read Shakespeare’s plays, you’re missing out on some quality zingers.

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I don’t understand why more people don’t appreciate Titus Andronicus with its wealth of sex, violence, trash talk, and effed up people…

roaminvagabond:

Been threatening to do this for ages, now here it is. A Hal and Poins appreciation post; because you just ~know that this is the best romance since the 15th Centruy

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I feel like the Hal/Ned bromance is not given enough attention in most adaptations of Henry IV, but Tom and David together were too adorable marvelous together.

sour-idealist:

angry-comics:

More Hamlet

 #YOUR UNCLE IS AN UNBELIEVABLE DOUCHECANOE is kind of an accurate summary of the whole play

Honestly, nothing is ever going to compete with the experience of actually seeing Shakespeare performed — whether it be a live performance or a good filmed adaptation. Plays are meant to be seen, and with the language barrier it’s more important for Shakespeare than for most other plays. 

Still, in lieu of (or, hopefully, in addition to) getting students educated through performance, this is probably the most innovative way of teaching Shakespeare. 

I mean, Derek Jacobi is reading to you — performing for you. And Olivier. And Branagh. When those men speak Shakespeare, you listen. It’s like an auditory reflex.