Club Fang
I am thinking of maybe getting into publishing, I have taken a year off now after my graduation and will be going to university next year. I also soon will be staying in London for half a year. I dont reayl know what the different jobs there are..

booksandpublishing:

Sounds so exciting!

Try all the big publishers you know, check their career pages or stalk them on LinkedIn to get contacts from the department you are interested in. Try to squeeze in as many internships as possible. It’s great to contact HR but I’ve learnt that it’s better to contact Editors, Marketing Managers, Publicity people directly, depending on what kind of work you want to do within a publishing house.

Don’t ignore the smaller presses, they will give you the priceless experience. Join publishing clubs. There’s one in London that I recommend: The Society of Young Publishers. 

Read The Bookseller. They have a jobs’ page which will familiarise you with the industry. There are specific publishing agencies to look out for such as Atwood Tate and Inspired Selection.

I have found HarperCollins in London to be the most approachable publishing house in terms of gaining experience. I myself interned their twice and applied for the graduate scheme. That’s another thing to look out for, graduate schemes. Keep checking their websites. Granta Books has an internship program as well and Penguin has a work experience slots which fill up months in advance.

There are people you can follow on Twitter to keep yourself updated. They are too many to name but I’ve linked my Twitter here so you can check the list of people I follow. You can start from here and see where that takes you.  

Guardian in London has a lot of what they call MasterClasses for writers. I learned a lot about the craft and also got to network with the London publishers while there. 

Good luck with everything. Feel free to get in touch with me if you have any specifc questions. Also, apologies for taking so long to get back. 

melvillehouse:

All day everyday.

alibraryismyparadise:

Reblog if you would like a nice message in your ask box

awesomepeoplereading:

Robert Englund reads.

awesomepeoplereading:

Robert Englund reads.

teapotsahoy:

randomthingieshere:

ALL IT TOOK WAS A RIDICULOUSLY LARGE PHONE TO MAKE POCKETS FOR WOMEN IMPORTANT

I don’t have a reaction gif for ‘I’m getting what I want, but in a way that makes me want to go on a killing spree.’

teapotsahoy

Something like this?

RIP Needs Dystopian Future Fiction Stories for Anthology - Pays $55/story

writingcareer:

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Raven International Publishing (RIP) has issued a call for submissions to receive sci-fi stories for a planned anthology titled, A Bleak New World. This anthology will be the publisher’s 2014-2015 Winter Anthology.

Publisher Joshua Clark and the staff are asking sci-fi writers to submit stories about a dystopian future. Dystopian societies are commonly defined by dehumanization, cultural stigmatization, police states, ecological tragedies

Read More

WHEN I WRITE IN A TERRIBLE MOOD AND SHIT GETS DARK

dukeofbookingham:

Afterwards I’m just like: 

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Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can’t, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.
Robert Frost (via bookphile)
thegetty:

What Beautiful Muscles You Have
Antonio Cattani created these engravings in the 1780s based on sculptures by Ercole Lelli, who examined at least 50 cadavers in preparation. The sculptures were created for the “anatomical theater” of the medical school at the University of Bologna, a room dedicated to the teaching of anatomy through dissections of human bodies. The engravings helped art students master the parts of the body.
More on these life-size engravings, new in the collection.
Anatomical Figures, 1780 (left) and 1781 (right), Antonio Cattani. The Getty Research Institute

thegetty:

What Beautiful Muscles You Have

Antonio Cattani created these engravings in the 1780s based on sculptures by Ercole Lelli, who examined at least 50 cadavers in preparation. The sculptures were created for the “anatomical theater” of the medical school at the University of Bologna, a room dedicated to the teaching of anatomy through dissections of human bodies. The engravings helped art students master the parts of the body.

More on these life-size engravings, new in the collection.

Anatomical Figures, 1780 (left) and 1781 (right), Antonio Cattani. The Getty Research Institute

The best candy shop a child can be left alone in, is the library.
Maya Angelou  (via book-answers)
You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.

C. S. Lewis (via lyssahumana)

[True.]

(via writingweasels)

How I feel after the rough draft of a book is done.

stacylwhitman:

authorlife:

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Or after finishing an edit.